Tag: William Thomson

William Thomson Q&A

Since 2016 William Thomson has established himself as one of the leading players of his WDBS Classification group, winning four main tournaments and reaching a further three finals to date.

We caught up with the reigning Stockport Open champion to talk about his snooker journey so far, including how former professional world champion has helped to improve his game…

Hi William, how have you found the past three months during these most unusual times?

Yes, it has been tough, I work with Serco Facilities Management at University Hospital Wishaw as a porter so being on the front line is hard. Then not having the snooker to go to after work has been strange. I’m sure my wife has found it difficult putting up with me. I’m not usually in the house every night, I’m usually at snooker most nights of the week.

Snooker is a big part of your life – how much have you missed being able to play?

Unfortunately, I don’t have my own table in my house. I practice and play at the Red Triangle Snooker Club in Cumbernauld on the match table or Fraser Patrick’s XingPai table. I think if you have a table in the house just now its priceless.

I also miss the friendships and laughs at the club as well not just playing. I would love to get back playing competitively but I think everyone agrees that safety comes first. But when we do I’m sure everyone will get a buzz from playing again.

Like Joe Hardstaff who we spoke to recently, you have been a regular at WDBS events for over four years since making your debut at the 2016 Manchester Classic. How much have you enjoyed competing during that time?

I love the competitions, that’s why I put the hours in and make the sacrifices I do. To go to competitions and play players with similar disabilities as myself is something I enjoy. I always look forward to WDBS competitions to play and to socialise with the players not just from my group but all groups.

Your Group is among the biggest and most competitive on the circuit, how impressed are you by the standard of players on the WDBS circuit?

Well the standard of play is getting higher every tournament. It was published last week the breaks the players have been getting in the tournaments and it’s not just how high the breaks are most of the players are doing it constantly. Some of these players have no arms, lost legs, are blind… It’s inspiring to watch the guys knock in long pots and breaks. I think as well with the release of the new world rankings it will make the tour more competitive.

In particular you have enjoyed a healthy rivalry with Daniel Blunn since your first event, a strong rivalry which has seen you both win matches against each other. What makes Daniel such a formidable opponent?

I really enjoy playing Daniel. We have had some good matches in the past, although I enjoy playing everyone on tour. Every player has a different style, different strengths and weakness, I enjoy having to adapt to how each plays and it excites me to face the different challenges that each brings to a match and each tournament.

How much has WDBS changed since your first event and what have you made of recent additions including our new ranking system?

When I first attended my first tournament players were in WDBS polo shirts and now we are fully dressed in waistcoats, dress trousers and shoes. It gives it more of a professional event feel, we were using club balls now every event we use match balls, new interactive scoreboards/pads are also great.

I think the new ranking system will give a bit of edge to the tournaments as well, everyone will want to play well in every tournament. There are also now chances to play in events like the WSF Open in Malta and at the Crucible.

Tell us about your disability and how this affects playing snooker for you.

I have CMT Type 1X, it effects my nerve endings and as a result I have muscle weakness in my hands and feet. I walk with orthotic splints on both legs. The weakness in my hands means I have changed how my bridge hand is, I mainly have problems bridging over balls as I have no strength in my fingers for a stable base.

My stance isn’t really affected due to my AFOs although I’m usually off balance when I walk round the table (usually mimicking a drunk man) but I assure you I don’t drink during tournament play. But overall, I think I’ve adapted well to my disability to enable me to play the best I can.

How did you first become interested in snooker and what made you want to pick up a cue yourself?

I was 11-years-old visiting my Aunt Dorothy in Peterborough before I went to Butlins in Skegness. Because she never saw me a lot, she took me into a sports shop and told me to pick anything I wanted. I picked up a cheap pool cue and she told me to put it back and she picked up a snooker cue instead and said get that one as your uncle John is paying for it anyway.

I went to Butlins, had two lessons from a pro there and played all week then won my first tournament at the end of that week before I came home. I then started playing in local snooker club, my mum and dad used to give me £3 every night to go practice. They said they preferred me going to snooker instead of hanging about street corners. At least they knew where I was.

You have been coached by former world champion Graeme Dott. What is that like and can you give us an example of a lesson that you have learned from him that has stuck with you?

Yeah I’m still getting coaching from Graeme. The first lesson I had with him was surreal. I go to his house and the next thing I’m in his snooker room getting a lesson from a former world champion. He’s such a down to earth guy as well.

My first lesson I was shaking like a leaf. Probably the most nervous I’ve been, but he put me at ease. I hit a few shots then he told me:

“I can’t teach you anything technically, you’re basically perfect. You cue and drive through the ball as well as anyone, you have a very strong game.”

To have a world champion telling me my game was strong and describing how he viewed my cue action, I can tell you I was in tears. Graeme has taught me more tactical and craft with the game. He describes things easily and makes sure it’s not too detailed, I remember him saying the game is difficult enough without making it more difficult.

As well as Graeme I have started working with Matt Andrews mentoring to help with my mental side of the game and I think that has given me more confidence to play the way I know I can play. It’s always good to have a former world champion and a mentor to have on the other side of a phone when your away on a tournament.

Away from WDBS you have also represented Scotland at European level and competed at Q School. What are your ambitions as a snooker player over the next few seasons?

My ambitions, improve my game, get better, learn and win tournaments, improve my rankings in both the Scottish Main Tour and WDBS Tour. Hopefully I can get into a position to get invited to more European events in the future.

What are your off-table interests and hobbies?

I love listening to music and I particularly like listening to Queen or 80s stuff. Friends are really important to me and I love socialising. I used to like playing golf before it all got too much for my body and I also was doing my teaching exams for playing keyboard before I stopped because of my hands. My interests now are being a dad to six-year-old Luca who also loves playing snooker taking him to the local snooker academy. He’s got the snooker bug I think.

How would you encourage other people with disabilities to get involved with snooker?

It’s so easy to get in touch with anyone from WDBS, through social media. It would be the best decision you would make. Players on the tour play for competition and also for friendships. It really is life changing for some players.

We wish William well and look forward to seeing him back on tour during the 2020/21 season. You can view all of his results at WDBS competitions so far here.

The Break Makers

Today we take a look back at the ‘break makers’ using statistics gathered from all of the World Disability Billiards and Snooker (WDBS) tournaments held to date.

The article is the first of a series of features looking back on the history of WDBS so far as we prepare to celebrate the fifth anniversary of our formation this summer.

Big Break

Since Raja Subramanian lit up the South West Snooker Academy with three breaks over 30, including runs of 57 and 53 during the same frame at our maiden event back in November 2015, there have now been over 400 ‘breaks over 30’ recorded across all eight classification groups by 73 individual players at WDBS tournaments.

The top ten breaks compiled to date are:

  1. Nick Neale – 92
  2. Dylan Rees – 87
  3. Nick Neale – 82
  4. Nick Neale – 82
  5. Shabir Ahmed – 81
  6. Nick Neale – 80
  7. Nick Neale – 80
  8. Dan Harwood – 77
  9. Nick Neale – 76
  10. Nick Neale – 75

It is Group 7 star and recently crowned WDBS Player of the Season 2019/20 Nick Neale who leads the way with seven of the ten highest WDBS breaks to his name, highlighted by a run of 92 crafted back at the 2018 Paul Hunter Disability Classic.

Hot on his heels is newcomer Dylan Rees, whose 87 came at our most recent event in Belgium back in March, while Shabir Ahmed (Group 8) and Dan Harwood (Group 6B) are also in the top ten.

By Player

With Neale dominating the list however, it is also interesting to look at the top 10 players as sorted by their best break to date to show a few of the other players to have established themselves as regular scorers in our competitions:

  1. Nick Neale – 92 (64 breaks)
  2. Dylan Rees – 87 (6 breaks
  3. Shabir Ahmed – 81 (30 breaks)
  4. Dan Harwood – 77 (14 breaks)
  5. Mike Gillespie – 72 (22 breaks)
  6. Paul Smith – 68 (18 breaks)
  7. William Thomson – 66 (28 breaks)
  8. Lewis Knowles – 61 (17 breaks)
  9. Andrew Galley – 60 (4 breaks)
  10. Mickey Chambers – 58 (15 breaks)

This list brings in a further two players from Group 7 with both Mike Gillespie and Paul Smith consistent scorers within the visually impaired category, while William Thomson and Mickey Chambers are the leading ambulant players, ahead of record champion Daniel Blunn, who is just outside of the top ten with 29 breaks (55 the highest) to his name.

By Group

  • Groups 1/2: Craig Welsh (47)
  • Group 3: Hannes Hermsdorf (53)
  • Group 4: William Thomson (66)
  • Group 5: Mickey Chambers (58)
  • Group 6A: Mohamed Faisal Butt (32)
  • Group 6B: Dan Harwood (77)
  • Group 7A: Gary Gallacher (43)
  • Group 7B: Nick Neale (92)
  • Group 8: Shabir Ahmed (81)

Of course, it is impossible to directly compare disabilities, hence the reason that players are split into their respective classification groups. What we can see however is the level of talent across all groups, with consistent scorers demonstrating how anyone can succeed at snooker, irrespective of their disability.

The wait goes on for the first WDBS century but with the many incredible players who compete on our circuit we look forward to celebrating our first centurion soon!

Please like and follow WDBS on Twitter and Facebook for the latest news and features about disability snooker.

Stockport Open 2020 – Tournament Review

Several champions were crowned during World Disability Snooker and Billiards’ (WDBS) opening event of the new calendar year at the popular Hazel Grove Snooker Club last weekend.

The Stockport Open 2020 featured competitors from six different disability classifications – involving those with physical and learning disabilities – and after a busy weekend of action where over 100 matches were played, the winners were confirmed.

Physical disabilities

In the bumper Group 2+4 competition which included cueists with ambulant impairments and wheelchair users, William Thomson returned to the winners’ podium to claim his fourth-career WDBS main event title.

The recent Scottish international began his campaign in ideal fashion, winning all four of his round robin matches 2-0 to finish top of Group A before notching up breaks of 30 and 53 to eliminate Kit Kennedy 2-0 in the knockout quarter-finals the following day.

Thomson dropped his first frame of the tournament during his last four encounter with two-time Open Disability finalist Andrew Harper on the black, but he recovered to take the next three and move into the final.

His opponent was 2016 Manchester Classic champion Andy Johnson, who like Thomson headed his group and came through a last eight tie against Peter Hull without relinquishing a frame. However, he needed a decider to deny former world professional number eight Dean Reynolds a maiden WDBS final in the semi-finals, spinning a 2-1 deficit into a 3-2 win.

Perhaps affected by his draining exploits against Reynolds, the last thing Johnson needed was Thomson starting strong, which he did, compiling a 62 break in chalking up frame one. Thomson never looked back as he registered a 3-0 triumph to collect his first title on the circuit in nearly 16 months.

Nigel Coton made it consecutive Group 3 titles after a flawless performance throughout the weekend.

A trio of 2-0 group wins on Saturday over Joe Hardstaff, John Teasdale and Kal Mattu rewarded him with top spot and a place in the final. The remaining spot went to maiden finalist and tour regular Mattu, who along with last year’s runner-up Hardstaff and winner Teasdale all finished on one victory each, however, Mattu progressed courtesy of a better frame difference.

Coton continued his relentless form, though, winning the competition without losing a single frame after a 3-0 final outcome to secure a hat-trick of career WDBS main event accolades and follow his glory at September’s UK Disability Championship.

Serial winner Mickey Chambers remains undefeated in club-based WDBS events after racking up a fifth title in the Group 5 category.

Preston’s Chambers – whose only loss on the circuit was during the Tour Championship at the Crucible Theatre last summer – won all three of his group games to top Group B. He did fall behind to 2019 Humber Classic finalist Ivor Halnosky in the semi-finals but turned it around to a emerge 3-1 winner.

Gareth Ward would meet Chambers for the gold medal; reaching his maiden tour final after capping Group A and then negotiating this season’s UK Disability Championship runner-up Dean Simmons. Ward was resilient in the final, mounting a comeback after losing the opening three frames, but 30-year-old Chambers held firm to get across the line 4-2.

Intellectual disabilities

Faisal Butt and Leroy Williams maintained their recent dominance of Groups 6A and 6B respectively.

Both Butt and Williams ended their round robin phases with 100% match records. Londoner Butt went one down to Warren Ealy in the semi-finals after losing on the black ball, although he swiftly re-established himself to advance into the final. There he would further his rivalry with Michael Busst, gaining some revenge for losing to Busst in the Champion of Champions final a few months previously by winning 3-0. The Stockport Open is Butt’s fifth WDBS title inside the past 12 months.

Williams has now won the last five Group 6B tournaments – a sequence stretching back to the Southern Classic last March. He needed to show battling qualities in the last four, though, as he twice trailed Matthew Haslam before sealing a 3-2 result. Christopher Goldsworthy, who has enjoyed a fine debut year on the WDBS scene, made his second final following his first at the aforementioned Southern Classic. Despite all four frames being relatively close, Williams ran out a 4-0 victor for his sixth overall title.

Challenge Cup

David Moore bounced back from his disappointment of not qualifying for Sunday’s knockout phase by clinching the Challenge Cup.

Reigning Humber Classic Group 5 champion Moore took the gold medal back to the south English coast after victories over Liam Crook, Phil Woodwiss, Nigel Brasier and then last year’s Group 3 winner at this venue, John Teasdale, 2-0 in the final.

The next stop on the WDBS circuit will be the Belgian Open from 7-8 March 2020. Enter online now: www.wdbs.info/tournament-entry/belgian-open-2020

Stockport Open 2020 | Tournament Preview

World Disability Billiards and Snooker will return to the Hazel Grove Snooker Club this weekend for its opening events of the new calendar year. The Stockport Open 2020 will feature a plethora of current and former champions mixing it with contenders and debut cueists from across several disability classification groups. 

Open Day 

Traditional with most WDBS events, the curtain is raised with our ‘Friday Open Day’ where we welcome individuals and groups to the venue, providing them with a relaxed atmosphere where they can learn about the organisation and receive tips from our dedicated coaches. Competitors for the weekend’s tournaments will also arrive and settle in, taking the opportunity to practise on the tables. 

Wheelchair and Ambulant Events (Groups 2-5) 

Several big-name players will contest the modified Group 2+4 event which features 19 entries. 

Multiple-time WDBS main event winner and Scottish international William Thomson is one of the fancied cueists to take the title, as too is wheelchair player Tony Southern, the reigning Belgian Open and UK Disability champion. 

Other contenders include former Manchester Classic winner Andy Johnson, last year’s runner-up Peter Yelland, two-time professional major ranking event finalist Dean Reynolds and youngster Ben Rawson. 

Twelve months ago, in the keenly contested Group 3 event, John Teasdale claimed his maiden WDBS main event title after a memorable comeback against Joe Hardstaff in the final. Both Teasdale and Hardstaff will be back, as too will former Open Disability champion Nigel Coton and tour regular Kal Mattu. 

Defending Group 5 champion Mickey Chambers will be seeking career title number five in Stockport but will face stiff opposition in rivals such as Humber Classic champion David Moore and recent main event finalists Dean Simmons and Ivor Halnosky. 2019 Challenge Cup winner Phil Woodwiss and three-time event semi-finalist Gareth Ward are also set to be present. 

Intellectual Disabilities (Groups 6A and 6B) 

In Group 6A, Faisal Butt will be looking to retain the title and pocket an incredible fifth victory inside a year. Butt has built up a rivalry with the also successful Michael Busst, who managed to overcome him in the Champion of Champions final in Gloucester last autumn. Warren Ealy and Michael Farrell – the other two qualifiers for that Champion of Champions – will be looking to secure their first gold medals. 

Leroy Williams is aiming to continue his recent dominance of Group 6B; the Liverpool based potter currently holds four main event accolades. Amongst the contenders to his title includes Christopher Goldsworthy, runner-up at the 2019 Southern Classic. 

You can keep up-to-date with all the action from Stockport throughout the weekend by visiting our social media channels on Facebook and Twitter, and all the latest draws and results via snookerscores.net here.

Field Set for Parris Cues Champion of Champions 2019

There is less than one week to go until the second staging of the Parris Cues Champion of Champions by World Disability Billiards and Snooker (WDBS) and we can today confirm the 23-player field who will compete at the event this year.

As in 2018, six tournaments will be held at the South West Snooker Academy in Gloucester from 12-13 October, with the most successful players from the previous two years invited to compete.

Each of the tournaments will begin with a round-robin group stage, with the top two players at the end of the group to contest a title match to decide the Champion of Champions for each classification.

The players who will be competing are:

Groups 1-2

Aslam Abubaker, Shahab Siddiqui, Danny Luton

Groups 4-5

Daniel Blunn, William Thomson, Mickey Chambers, David Church

Group 6A

Faisal Butt, Mike Busst, Michael Farrell, Warren Ealy

Group 6B

Leroy Williams, Peter Geronimo, Christopher Goldsworthy*

Group 7

Gary Gallacher, Nick Neale, Ronnie Allen, Mike Gillespie

Group 8

Shabir Ahmed, Lewis Knowles, Blake Munton, Nicholas Cash

*only three players will contest Group 6B due to the non-entry of the remaining eligible players

As previously stated, this year’s event will not include tournaments for Groups 3 and 7A due to only one counting event having been played for each category following the changes to the WDBS Classification system made this year. Results from tournaments already played will however be carried forward to next year’s Champion of Champions event.

In addition to becoming champion of their respective groups, this year’s winners will each be presented with the perpetual Nick Oliver Trophy and will receive a keepsake trophy to take home and keep.

Further tournament information, including the prize money schedule and match schedule will be published in due course.

Champion of Champions to Return to Gloucester

World Disability Billiards and Snooker (WDBS) is today pleased to confirm that this season’s Parris Cues Champion of Champions event will return to the South West Snooker Academy in Gloucester following its successful first staging last year.

In a change to the previously announced dates – the prestigious event will run from 12-13 October 2019, a week earlier than originally advertised.

This year’s competition will see the most decorated players on the WDBS circuit from the past two seasons invited to compete across six individual competitions, with the winners set to see their names inscribed on the stunning Nick Oliver Trophy.

The players who will be invited to compete in this year’s event are:

Groups 1-2

Daniel Lee, Aslam Abubaker, Kurt Deklerck, Shahab Siddiqui*

*Tony Southern has already indicated that he will not be available to compete

Groups 4-5

Daniel Blunn, Mickey Chambers, William Thomson, David Church.

Group 6A

Faisal Butt, Mike Busst, David Mac, Michael Farrell.

Group 6B

Daniel Harwood, Leroy Williams, Peter Geronimo, Andrew Galley.

Group 7

Nick Neale, Paul Smith, Ronnie Allen, Mike Gillespie.

Group 8

Shabir Ahmed, Blake Munton, Nicholas Cash, Lewis Knowles.

WDBS can confirm that this year’s event will not include tournaments for Groups 3 and 7A due to only one counting event having been played for each category following the changes to the WDBS Classification system made this year. Results from tournaments already played will however be carried forward to next year’s Champion of Champions event.

Each of the players listed above will be contacted to confirm their entry to the event in due course. Should any player not be available their place will be taken by the next player on the qualification list from that group.

Read our report of last season’s Champion of Champions HERE.

Northern Classic 2019: Tournament Preview

The opening World Disability Billiards and Snooker (WDBS) event of the new year takes place this weekend at the renowned Hazel Grove Snooker Club in Stockport, which will be hosting WDBS competition for the first time.

Consisting of five separate tournaments, the 2019 Northern Classic features players with a range of physical and learning disabilities who will contest their respective classification groups and will be sponsored by BB Scaffolding.

DSActive Day

Ahead of the competitive action the weekend will begin with a special open day which will be supported by the Down syndrome initiative DSActive.

People with all disabilities, including Down syndrome are welcomed to the club to try snooker regardless of experience and receive coaching from our team of WPBSA World Snooker coaches at the Go Green Energy Coaching Zone.

Groups 1-2

The wheelchair category continues to be one of the most exciting and competitive sections on the WDBS scene, although Daniel Lee is currently the player to beat.

Lee enjoyed a terrific 2018 campaign that saw him secure a trio of titles; the multi-classification Welsh Open, the Champion of Champions and he heads to Stockport as the defending Northern Classic champion.

He faces a difficult task holding onto his crown, though. Reigning Open Disability champion Aslam Abubaker broke his WDBS duck in Northampton last September and now he has a taste for more success.

There will also be no lack of motivation for fellow entrants Tony Southern, Glyn Lloyd and Shahab Siddiqui – all previous finalists on the circuit who are hoping to go all the way this time around.

Group 3

Following feedback received from players Group 3 will consist solely of ambulant players with one or more upper limbs either absent or severely impaired.

This means that a number of previous Group 3 winners with either full use, or moderately impaired upper limbs will be re-classified either as Group 4 or Group 5 players.

Of those who are set to contest the Group 3 tournament however is Nigel Coton, a former winner back in 2016 at the Open Disability Snooker Championship.

He will be joined by the likes of John Teasdale, Joe Hardstaff and Kal Mattu, all experienced competitors on the WDBS circuit.

Groups 4-5*

Several familiar names appear in the line-up for the Group 4/5 tournament that boasts a healthy number of entries, boosted further by those previously classified as Group 3 competitors.

Headline players include reigning champion Mickey Chambers and recent Champion of Champions winner David Church, who will resume their ongoing struggle for supremacy in the division – they have shared the last four titles between themselves.

Within the field of cueists who are seeking to break up this recent dominance are former Manchester Classic champions Andy Johnson and David Weller. They will also be joined by multiple WDBS champions Daniel Blunn and William Thomson, who met in the Group 3 final of this event a year ago.

In form David Moore will also be another player to watch. Moore benefited from being a late replacement for Gloucester a few months ago where he topped the round robin before losing to Church in the final.

A quarter-finalist on debut at Barratts in the Autumn, Marcin Kubalski will once again make the trip across from Poland to pit his wits on the WDBS tour.

Female players Danielle Findlay and Maureen Rowland also form part of a diverse jigsaw.

*Note that subject to entries, there may be individual competitions for Groups 4 and 5.

Groups 6A / 6B

For only the second time players with intellectual disabilities will have the opportunity to compete in Group 6 events across the full weekend.

Twelve months ago, in Preston, it was third time lucky for Leroy Williams in a WDBS final as he recorded his first triumph on the circuit. The defending champion is back aiming to retain his title in the 6B autistic section but faces stiff opposition from several quarters.

This includes fellow Liverpool based star Daniel Harwood, who is looking to continue his impressive streak on tour. Already a record equaling six-time WDBS winner, Harwood claimed the prestigious Champion of Champions and Hull Open titles towards the back end of 2018.

Reigning Humber Classic champion Peter Geronimo will also be making the trip up from London.

In the Group 6A learning disabilities discipline, Mike Busst will try to build on his maiden victory in Hull last November.  Among others, he will be joined by Hull finalist Faisal Butt and Alexandra Mendham, who was a semi-finalist in this event last year.

The Northern Classic runs from 8-10 February 2019 at the Hazel Grove Snooker Centre in Stockport and you can follow updates online here and at our social media pages.

Preview by Matt Huart and Michael Day.

Parris Cues Champion of Champions 2018: Live Stream

Watch our live stream from the Parris Cues Champions of Champions 2018 at the South West Snooker Academy below:

Streaming schedule:

Saturday 20th October

  • Dan Harwood v Leroy Williams (G6)
  • William Thomson v Daniel Blunn (G3)
  • Nick Neale v Mike Gillespie (G7)

Sunday 21st October

  • TBC
  • FINAL TBC

Parris Cues Champion of Champions 2018: Tournament Information

The full match schedule for the Parris Cues Champion of Champions 2018 is now available.

As always, the latest results and group standings will be published throughout the weekend at MySnookerStats via the following links:

As previously announced, the winners of each group competition will also be invited to play at the 2019 WSF Championships in Dubai.

Read more about the event here.

Field Confirmed for Parris Cues Champion of Champions

Later this month World Disability Billiards and Snooker (WDBS) will host the Parris Cues Champion of Champions for the first time and we can today reveal the 24 players who will be competing in the event.

To be held at the South West Snooker Academy in Gloucester on the weekend of 20-21 October 2018, the event will comprise six tournaments with the most successful four players from each of the regular WDBS classification groups between November 2015 – May 2018 invited to participate.

Each of the tournaments will begin with a round-robin group stage, with the top two players at the end of the group to contest a title match to decide the Champion of Champions for each classification.

The players who will be competing are:

Groups 1-2

Graham Bonnell, Craig Welsh, Daniel Lee, Tony Southern

Group 3

Daniel Blunn, Nigel Coton, William Thomson, Andrew Harper

Groups 4-5

Raja Subramanian, Andy Johnson, David Church, David Weller

Group 6

Daniel Harwood, Leroy Williams, Rich Yendle, Andrew Galley

Group 7

Paul Smith, Nick Neale, Mike Gillespie, David Baker

Group 8

Shabir Ahmed, Blake Munton, Lewis Knowles, Richard Gott

As previously announced, each of the six winners will receive an invitation to compete at next year’s WSF Championships in Dubai, with the costs of their travel and hotel to be sponsored by 360Fizz.

The winners will also receive the first prize and be presented with the Nick Oliver Trophy by John Parris, of the event sponsor Parris Cues. Each group winner will also receive their own trophy to take home and keep.

The Parris Cues Champion of Champions will become an annual event on the calendar, with the top performing players from each group over a two-year period qualifying for the event.

Spectators are encouraged to attend and support the players competing in the event.